Monthly Archives: April 2015

City of Waterbury v. Connecticut Alliance of City Police — A New Standard of Impartiality for Arbitrators in Interest Arbitrations?

The Superior Court’s decision in City of Waterbury v. Connecticut Alliance of City Police, could mark the emergence of a new standard of impartiality for party-selected arbitrators in Municipal Employee Relations Act [“MERA”] interest arbitrations.  In the decision, Superior Court Judge Brazzel-Massaro disqualified a union attorney from sitting on a MERA interest arbitration panel after the…

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Student Privacy In Online Educational Services

The commercial use of data mined by providers of online educational services, such as Internet homework portals, digital grade books for teachers, and student e-mail programs, continues to be a hot topic on numerous fronts.  On February 26, 2015, the United States Department of Education issued guidance entitled “Protecting Student Privacy While Using Online Educational…

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Presidential Politics, E-Mail, And The FOIA: Why It Should Matter To You

The federal Freedom of Information Act [“FOIA”] has recently made its way into national new stories for all the wrong reasons.  Hillary Clinton has become enmeshed in a controversy involving her use of a “private” e-mail account for conducting official business.  In addition, in a development that can charitably be described as ironic, the White House…

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Latest Developments From The Connecticut General Assembly: The Education Committee Completes its Work

The General Assembly’s Education Committee was quite active just before its March 30, 2015 deadline for approving bills.   On March 25, 2015, the Education Committee voted favorably on and advanced out of committee the following additional proposed bills: S.B. No. 1097 (RAISED) AN ACT CONCERNING STATE FUNDING FOR EDUCATION.  This bill would (a) provide that…

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Atlanta Educators Face Twenty Years in Prison After Jury Convicts Them of Racketeering

The New York Times reported this Wednesday and Thursday that the jury has convicted eleven of twelve educators of conspiring to alter and inflate student scores on standardized testing utilized to gauge compliance with, and eligibility for, funding incentives under the federal No Child Left Behind Act. As we discussed in a post last summer,…

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