Topic: title ix

THE ELEMENTS OF TITLE IX LIABILITY IN FEMINIST MAJORITY FOUNDATION V. UNIVERSITY OF MARY WASHINGTON AND K.T. V. CULVER-STOCKTON COLLEGE

Two recent federal court cases delineate the requisite elements of a Title IX deliberate indifference claim brought by students against educational entities. In Feminist Majority Foundation v. University of Mary Washington, the plaintiffs – consisting of the national Feminist Majority Foundation [“FMF”], Feminists United on Campus, an FMF affiliate, and five executive board members of…

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LIMITING TITLE IX LIABILITY IN DOE V. THE CITADEL

A decision issued by the Court of Appeals of South Carolina underscores the limitations of college and university liability under Title IX. In John Doe v. The Citadel, the court declined to extend standing to sue under Title IX to an individual who had no relationship to the educational institution but had been sexually assaulted…

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Doe v. Brown University: Non-Students and the Limits of Title IX Liability

In a case that raises a number of interesting questions, a federal judge in Rhode Island recently held that a student at one school could not bring a Title IX action against another school following her sexual assault by some of the latter school’s students. In Jane Doe v. Brown University, the court granted Brown…

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Stick to the Script: The Consequences of Mishandling Sexual Misconduct Investigations in Doe v. Skidmore College

It would seem fairly self-evident that when a college or university establishes procedures for handling sexual misconduct claims, it should actually follow them.  That, however, was not the case in Matter of John Doe v. Skidmore College, a recently issued decision by the State of New York Supreme Court, Appellate Division.  Given what it termed…

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Canary in a Coal Mine: Analyzing Title IX, OCR, and On-Campus Sexual Misconduct Adjudications in Plummer v. University of Houston

It is unusual for a dissenting opinion to be more noteworthy than the majority’s holding, yet that is the case in Plummer v. University of Houston, a decision recently handed down by the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit.  Except for the unsavory facts upon which the decision is based and Judge…

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Rebel Without A Stall: Title IX, Transgender Student Rights and Whitaker v. Kenosha

When the Trump Administration short-circuited the United States Supreme Court’s review of Gloucester v. G.G., in which the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit had held that Title IX’s protections extend to transgender students, it seemed that transgender students’ rights were on life support.  Like Jarvis Lorry in Charles Dickens’ Tale of…

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Check Please: OCR’s Future in the Wake of Proposed Budget Cuts

Published reports indicate that President Trump’s proposed budget includes what is approximately a fifty percent reduction in the prior fiscal year’s funding for the United States Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights [“OCR”]. OCR is charged with responsibility for investigating student discrimination claims in public school districts as well as in private schools, colleges,…

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Flushed: Supreme Court Vacates Fourth Circuit’s Title IX Transgender Bathroom Decision in Gloucester County v. G.G.

In a not particularly surprising development, on March 6, 2017, the United States Supreme Court vacated the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit’s judgment in the controversial case of Gloucester County School Board v. G.G. and remanded it to the Fourth Circuit for further consideration. Click here to read the order.  The…

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Governor Malloy Issues Executive Order On Transgender Students’ Use of Bathrooms in Public Schools

On Wednesday, President Trump’s administration decided to rescind, pending further review, the Obama administration’s federal guidance that requires transgender students receive access to the restrooms and locker rooms of their chosen gender identity. In response, Governor Malloy yesterday issued his own Executive Order that essentially renders the President’s action void in Connecticut and requires Connecticut’s…

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Title IX and Due Process: University Enrollment as Property Interest in DOE v. ALGER

Tuition-wise, public universities have long been considered a better option than private schools, and in Doe v. Alger, a federal court in Virginia held that public university tuition may bring an additional bonus, that being a constitutionally protected property interest in continued enrollment.  In Doe, the court held that the plaintiff student’s payment of tuition…

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